You Can Get Your Auto Insurance Deductible Back from an At-Fault Driver

You Can Get Your Auto Insurance Deductible Back from an At-Fault Driver

Your auto insurance deductible is the amount of money you have to pay out-of-pocket when you file a claim with your insurer. However, when you’re in an auto collision and you aren’t at fault, it isn’t your insurance company you’re filing the claim with; it’s theirs. The liability insurance of the at-fault driver should be paying for your repairs, including the deductible. However, there are certain instances where filing a claim with your insurance company – even if you’re not the at-fault driver – can be beneficial. One of the biggest benefits of dealing with your own insurance company is that you’ll receive your compensation much faster than you otherwise would working with the other driver’s insurance company. If your busy life requires the use of your vehicle immediately, it may be worthwhile to file an auto insurance claim with your insurance carrier. The down side to dealing with your own auto insurance company is that you’ll have to pay your own deductible, however, it’s possible to have your deductible reimbursed from the at-fault driver’s insurance company. Once you file a claim and the payout is made, your auto insurance company will begin the process of subrogation to recoup the funds from the at-fault driver’s insurance company. Subrogation is the legal right for party one (your auto insurance company) to pay party two’s (the at-fault driver’s insurance company) debt to party three (you), then seek reimbursement back from party two. When your auto insurance company enters into the subrogation process, they’re legally obligated to not only inform you, but to try to recover your deductible in the process and then...
It pays to keep track of what your insurance policy covers

It pays to keep track of what your insurance policy covers

If you’re like most consumers, your eyes glaze over when someone asks you what your insurance policy covers. And we’re not just talking homeowners insurance – we’re talking auto policies, renter policies … virtually any kind of insurance policy you might have that’s currently in effect. Let’s take auto insurance as an example: Most of us know about the many benefits of having auto insurance and how it will help protect our assets. But sometimes we learn too late that we’re under-insured when a major situation comes up. 4AutoInsuranceQuote.com offered up a horror story about a 20-year-old lady from Richmond, Va. named Kathy. She was sideswiped by another motorist on her way home from work. The collision drove her into a light post on the side of the road and left her with a severely wrenched neck. She went to the hospital to have it checked out and reported the incident to her insurance company the next morning. She assumed she would be reimbursed for her medical bills. But since the other guy didn’t have insurance and her policy didn’t have under-insured motorist bodily injury coverage, she was out of luck. She ended up having to pay $800 out of pocket. Another policyholder made an ever sillier mistake. He switched his auto coverage to another company. But six months down the road he received two bills, one from his old company and another from the new one. Seems he forget to cancel his previous policy, figuring it would automatically cancel. Wrong! You always have to cancel your old policy once you’ve switched companies. Otherwise, you may be paying for coverage you...
How Much Does Driving Experience Influence Auto Insurance Rates?

How Much Does Driving Experience Influence Auto Insurance Rates?

Insurance is all about risk. Two people can buy the same auto insurance policy from the same insurer and pay very different premiums if one of them appears to be a riskier driver than the other. One of the factors that insurance companies consider when quoting someone a price on an auto insurance policy is their driving experience. Generally speaking, younger drivers with fewer years behind the wheel will pay more for auto insurance than older drivers who have long records of safe driving. However, a lack of experience is only one of the reasons that a younger driver will pay more for their auto insurance premium than a more experienced driver, all things being equal. Younger drivers tend to show increased rates of impaired driving and other dangerous driving habits – particularly young men. There are twice as many collision-related deaths among 16 to 17-year-old drivers than there are between 18 and 19-year-old drivers, and 3 times as many collision-related deaths of drivers between 18 and 19 than there are for drivers who are 20. It’s a sad statistic and, unfortunately, the jury is out as to whether or not the major factor in these collisions is a lack of driving experience or if it’s age-related. An experienced driver’s lower insurance premium will only be enjoyed temporarily. As people age, their risk of getting into a traffic collision increases, and people will have to pay larger premiums for their auto insurance once again. No matter how old you are, or how much driving experience you have, the best way to keep your premiums down is to drive safely...
Talking or texting while driving could soon become a moving violation

Talking or texting while driving could soon become a moving violation

If you’ve lived in California for any length of time, you’re well aware that driving while talking on your phone or texting is against the law. The talking part wouldn’t apply if you are using a hands-free device or your car’s hands-free option. But short of that, you will be facing a fine if caught. The fine for a first offense is $20 and subsequent fines are $50. But once assessments are added in, the total for a first offense is actually about $150 and a second offense can cost you more than $250. And if state Sen. Josh Newman, D-Fullerton, gets his way, you’ll be dealing with more than that. The California state Senate unanimously passed Senate Bill 1030 last month. Authored  by Newman, the measure would make distracted driving a moving violation, not just an infraction. Under current California law, a conviction for abusing the law does appear on your driving record, but it doesn’t add a point. If SB 1030 gets signed into law the fines would stay the same but the violator would also get a point on his or her driving record. And that can cause your insurance rates to go up. “Current penalties in California don’t go far enough to deter dangerous distracted driving behavior,” Newman says on his website. “Every year thousands of people statewide are seriously injured or killed in collisions caused by distracted driving. These collisions are 100 percent preventable. SB 1030 adds an additional deterrent to this dangerous behavior to prevent more senseless injuries and deaths.” According to AAA, texting while driving increases the odds of a crash by 2 to...
Will Auto Insurance Repaint My Car?

Will Auto Insurance Repaint My Car?

Your car’s paint job plays an important role in keeping your car looking shiny and new. Unfortunately, it’s really easy to mess up and can be costly to repair. Luckily, if you wind up in an accident where you aren’t the at-fault driver your auto insurance will be able to pay the cost to f ix the paint and/or any body work that needs to be done. It’s rare for a vehicle to be in a collision and not receive some sort of damage to the paint job. If the damage to your vehicle occurs and someone else is the at-fault driver, their liability insurance should cover the necessary restoration. You may not get your whole vehicle repainted if only one part of it has received damage to the paint, and your paint job is otherwise new. For example, if someone were to hit the side of your bumper and damage it, and only it, it’s likely that the extent of the repaint will be in that area only, unless it can be proved that there was damage elsewhere that was a result of the collision. If you happen to be the at-fault driver in an accident and you’re hoping your insurance company will take care of any damages, you had better hope you bought extra protections. Liability auto insurance only pays for the other person’s vehicle repairs – not yours. To ensure your repairs are covered too, you’ll want collision insurance and possibly even comprehensive auto insurance. Of course, if the damage is minor, you may not want to get insurance involved at all and just pay for...
Filing an Auto Insurance Claim for a Keyed Car

Filing an Auto Insurance Claim for a Keyed Car

Walking up to your vehicle and finding out that it has been keyed can be a maddening experience, and it’s not all that uncommon. Keying cars, breaking windows and smashing headlights are common forms of vandalism used by either individuals looking to inflict revenge on someone for a perceived wrong or by run-of-the-mill ne’er-do-wells interested in creating problems for random people. Regardless, keyed vehicles are considered vandalism – something that’s typically covered under comprehensive auto insurance – and it’s possible to have the damage paid for by your insurance company if you file a claim. The first step is to check your auto insurance policy to see if vandalism or “other than collision” damage is covered. If it is, there will likely be two amounts associated with the coverage. One of these amounts will be your deductible (the money you pay out-of-pocket) and the other will be your coverage limit (the amount of money your auto insurance company will be willing to pay, after your deductible). Once you’ve ascertained that your insurance company will cover the damages, it’s time to file a claim. Filing an Auto Insurance Claim Step 1 Make sure you file a police report if your vehicle is vandalized. Most insurance companies will require a copy if you plan to file a claim, so make sure you get one.  Step 2 You’ll need to report the claim directly to the insurance carrier, so call their insurance claims number (if you have one) or call your insurance agent to get help.  Step 3 Speak with the claims adjuster. When a vehicle is damaged via vandalism, the insurance...